Replacing PCV valve on 2019 Equinox 1.5L Turbo

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djmarch

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Cannot find a torx or hex bit to remove the bolt that holds the PCV valve in place. It looks to be tappered bit that's needed to remove. Any recommendations will be truly appreciated.
 

SteveK

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go to a chev dealer or jobber with a picture and ask for the tool?
 

ravenblack67

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Cannot find a torx or hex bit to remove the bolt that holds the PCV valve in place. It looks to be tappered bit that's needed to remove. Any recommendations will be truly appreciated.
I just looked at mine. It is a screw that is not designed to be removed without some sort of special tool. I suspect vice grips will do the job.
 

57chevythunder

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well, I'm confused: According to everything I've read, this engine does not have a PCV valve.
(same car, same engine, same year as mine)
 

ricklack

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I am pretty sure the PCV valve is internal on the 1.5T.

Also, I would caution trying to use a tool that is not designed for the job. The repair could get a lot more costly than the cost of the correct tool, or if you let a garage change the PCV.

My first job as a mechanic, the owner of the garage always said "your tools are your hands". IE, don't scrimp on tools and always try to use the right tool for the job. First hand experience is that ignoring that always complicated things LOL
 

57chevythunder

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I believe it is orifice (or restrictor) sandwiched between the cylinder head and engine block. And as such, I think there is nothing about it that should require replacement.
On the other hand, there are a couple of "fresh air" valves in the circuit, one on each bank of the camshaft case. And heads of the fasteners on those two parts VERY DIFINITELY have a totally unconventional recessed pattern. -I think they are under the category of "one time use." Yes, it would be interesting to see what an experienced dealer service technician would have to say about it.
I also see a line that connects to the turbo-charger and runs to a fitting on the rear bank of the camshaft case.
I remember reading somewhere about the design and operation of the crankcase ventilation system on this engine. There are two distinctly different modes of operation, depending on whether the engine air intake manifold is operating under vacuum, no turbo boost, or under pressure with turbo boost active.
The bottom line to me is that this is not the simple PCV system that we have all been used to for decades.
It seems to me that the crankcase ventilation components of this engine certainly do not fall under the category of ordinary "service" items. -sort of like, "its probably not malfunctioning, so it doesn't need servicing."

Anyway, that is just my observation and opinion. Hope you get better answers.
 

PoManNox

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I was curious on how the PCV system worked on the LYX 1.5 turbo and asked on another board I frequent. A fella over there posted this:



"You can't see the PCV that's used under vacuum, It's integral to the valve cover, cylinder head, & intake manifold. 3 in the diagram.

Operation.....

The crankcase ventilation system is used to consume crankcase vapors in the combustion process instead of venting vapors to the atmosphere. Fresh air from the intake system is supplied to the crankcase and mixed with blow-by gases inside the crankcase. Blow-by gases rise to the top of the engine and are picked up into the oil separation chamber in the camshaft cover, where oil is separated from the gases. Blow-by gases are then passed to the intake manifold to be consumed by normal combustion, through a calibrated orifice inside of the camshaft cover.

Fresh air is brought into the engine through the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) valve (4) as long as the crankcase is under vacuum. The primary control is through the PCV orifice (3) which meters the flow into intake manifold, at a rate depending on manifold vacuum. The PCV orifice is an integral part of the camshaft cover. Under certain operating conditions, the system is designed to allow excessive amounts of blow by gases to flow through the PCV valves (1 or 2) depending on if the engine is in boost mode or excessive crankcase pressure is detected and then routed into the intake system to be consumed by normal combustion.

Turbo Applications:

During normal operating conditions the PCV gases are routed using PCV valve (3) and the internal passage within the camshaft cover. When the Turbo is active, check valve (3) is closed and check valve (1) opens and PCV gases are routed back to the turbocharger to be consumed by normal combustion. If the engine sees excessive positive crankcase pressure check valve (2) opens and the pressure is routed to the air inlet to be reintroduced into the engine.

Non-Turbo Applications:

During normal operating conditions the PCV gases are routed using check valve (3) and the internal passage within the camshaft cover. If the engine sees excessive positive crankcase pressure check valve (2) opens and the pressure is routed to the air inlet. Also for non-turbo applications check valve (1) does not exist.


In any application check valve (2) is only used if the engine sees excessive crankcase pressure."

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